Professor Brett Nixon

Professor Brett Nixon

An investigator of indomitable spirit, Professor Brett Nixon is pursuing the mysteries of sperm dysfunction from multiple, linked perspectives. A HMRI and University of Newcastle researcher, Brett is a world leader in male infertility research.
View Brett's research outputs through his University of Newcastle profile > 

 

Biography

Professor Brett Nixon is the Director of the HMRI Infertility and Reproduction Program. He is also a Senior Research Fellow of the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia and co-Director of the University of Newcastle’s Priority Research Centre for Reproductive Science.

Over his career, Brett has conducted research activity at the basic biology / clinical andrology interface, gaining international recognition for his mechanistic insights into how spermatozoa acquire the functional competence to engage in fertilisation, and how this process becomes so dramatically disrupted in cases of male infertility.

More recently, his research has expanded to focus on the mechanisms by which environmental exposures impact sperm quality and the repercussions of such changes for embryo development. This research has broad application for the diagnosis of sperm dysfunction and the design of novel therapeutic intervention strategies to alleviate the burden of male infertility and improve offspring health.

 

Research Interests

  • Reproduction
  • Infertility
  • In vitro fertilisation (IVF)
  • Gamete biology

 

Specialised/Technical Skills

  • Reproduction
  • Infertility
  • In vitro fertilisation (IVF)
  • Gamete biology
  • Proteomics
  • Epigenetics
     

Affiliations

 

Why did you get into research?

My interest in reproductive research was initially sparked during my time growing up on a local farm, where I came to appreciate the importance of artificial breeding technologies both in the context of livestock improvement and for the conservation of our country’s unique fauna.

More recently, my firsthand experience with the emotional toll that an infertility diagnosis can cause has inspired my commitment to trying resolve the mechanistic basis of infertility and harnessing this knowledge for the development of improved therapeutic options.
What would be the ultimate goal for your research?

My research focuses on refining our knowledge of the reproductive process with the ultimate goal of resolving the root causes of infertility; a condition that now afflicts approximately 1 in every 6 couples in Australia.

It is my hope that our research will enhance our ability to diagnose infertility and allow us to develop effective therapeutic strategies to alleviate the burden of infertility.