One person, one family, one community at a time, the Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI) fights the illnesses affecting lives throughout the world. Our translational research model aligns over 1500 researchers, students and support staff from Hunter New England Health and the University of Newcastle, inspiring new discoveries to deliver a healthier future.

Throughout Newcastle and the Hunter region researchers, students and support staff are working across six HMRI Research Programs to prevent, cure and treat a diverse range of serious illnesses by translating research findings made in the laboratory into real health treatments and preventative strategies. Internationally-recognised research outcomes are being achieved in asthma and airway diseases, cancer, diabetes, mental health, nutrition, pregnancy and reproduction, stroke and more. Collaborations are being conducted with institutes on all points of the globe.

HMRI provides vital funding and facilities to fuel research, but the heart and soul of the Institute are people – the researchers, the generous donors and supporters, the committed volunteers, and the patients who participate in trials and ultimately benefit from the research results.

Upcoming Events

Costa Rica Coast2Coast Challenge
July 9, 2020 - 6:00pm to 7:00pm

Join us on Thursday July 9 from 6pm for another great HMRI virtual event where we gain an insight into the importance of eliminating the gap in Indigenous health and the work that’s being done here in the Hunter to benefit communities nationwide.

Costa Rica Coast2Coast Challenge
March 1, 2021 - 9:00am to March 31, 2021 - 5:00pm

A team of 20 Borne HMRI supporters will embark on a unique, off-the-beaten-track adventure across Costa Rica.

Latest News & Articles

Jun 29 2020

More than $1 million has been announced by the Federal Government to support researchers investigating how to combat the most common and severely debilitating, however vastly undertreated, side effect of stroke – fatigue.

Jun 29 2020

Isobel Stoodley has a passion for helping people be stronger for longer. While her research is aimed at people 65+ she feels that terms such as elderly are outdated, and don’t really apply to the people she sees in her daily work.

Jun 26 2020

With more cases popping up and fear of a second wave, where is the research for a COVID-19 vaccine up to?

Jun 23 2020

Dr Kelly Avery-Kiejda is an HMRI affiliated researcher from the University of Newcastle's School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy who is passionate about delivering solutions to breast cancer. Although research has come a long way in the last twenty years in particular, breast cancer is still the most common cancer in women - and the 2nd leading cause of cancer-related deaths in Australian women.