Dr Danielle Bond

Dr Danielle Bond - Cancer Researcher
Project Grant
2018 Project Grant
Project Grant
2017 Project Grant
Project Grant
2016 Project Grant
Project Grant
2015 Project Grant
Project Grant
2014 Project Grant

What are your research interests?

  • To develop and test novel treatments for pancreatic cancer patients who don't respond to current treatments
  • To elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying pancreatic cancer so that we can design novel treatments that lead to better patient outcomes
  • To assess novel blood markers for prostate cancer diagnosis and prognosis

Why did you get into research?

My interest in medical research started with a passion for learning about how the human body functions normally and during disease, plus I have always been passionate about helping others. When my Nana, who helped raise me, succumbed to colon cancer I decided to follow my interests and pursue a career in cancer research in order to focus on finding new, effective cancer treatments.

What would be the ultimate goal for your research?

My ultimate goal is to improve patient quality of life by finding new treatments for different types of cancers such as pancreatic and prostate cancer. I would also like to find novel markers that predict how a patient responds to cancer therapeutics so we can tailor treatments to the individual patient. 

Biography

Dr Bond is an Early Career Research Associate in the School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy. She is based at the Central Coast campus of the University of Newcastle, working within the cancer research hub at Ourimbah in association with the Hunter Cancer Research Alliance (HCRA) and HMRI. She uses cutting-edge technology to test novel synthetic and natural products for the treatment of pancreatic cancer, as part of the Pancreatic Cancer Research Group, and is identifying blood markers in prostate cancer patients to help predict patient prognosis to current and new cancer treatments.

Dr Bond is primarily interested in pancreatic cancer as it has a very low survival rate and prostate cancer due to its high incidence rate among Australian men. She completed her PhD in Medical Biochemistry, which focused on breast and prostate cancers at the University of Newcastle in 2015. Since 2015, Dr Bond has been testing novel, natural and synthetic compounds as anti-pancreatic cancer agents and has been investigating blood markers for prostate cancer.

She has presented her work at both national and international conferences and continues to publish her findings, has helped organise local scientific meetings and has been an RHD representative for the school research committee. Dr Bond has received pilot grant funding through the Faculty of Health at the University of Newcastle and project funding from HMRI.

Future Focus

Dr Bond will continue to search for novel natural and synthetic anti-cancer treatments that will improve the quality of life of cancer patients and will continue to aim to identify markers that predict treatment response, so we can administer effective anti-cancer treatments that improve patient outcomes.

Specialised/Technical Skills 

  • Drug discovery
  • Natural products 
  • Biomarkers of prognosis
  • Bioactive compounds
  • 3D cell culture models
  • Functional cell culture assays
  • Microvesicle collection and analysis
  • Bioinformatics
  • Micro-RNA analysis

Affiliations

  • Hunter Cancer Research Alliance (HCRA)
  • PRC Cancer and the HMRI Cancer Program
  • Australian Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB)
  • Australia Society of Medical Research (ASMR)
  • American Association for Cancer Research (AACR)

2018

Tetraspanin CD9; more than just an exosome marker - A novel biomarker to target for prostate cancer
Project Grant
Description:

Currently the major hurdle facing the successful treatment of solid cancers is the development of metastases (tumour spread), and our lack of understanding of what controls this process.

more

2017

Tetraspanin CD9; more than just an exosome marker - A novel biomarker to target for prostate cancer
Project Grant
Description:

Currently the major hurdle facing the successful treatment of solid cancers is the development of metastases (tumour spread), and our lack of understanding of what controls this process.

more

2016

Tetraspanin CD9; more than just an exosome marker - A novel biomarker to target for prostate cancer
Project Grant
Description:

Currently the major hurdle facing the successful treatment of solid cancers is the development of metastases (tumour spread), and our lack of understanding of what controls this process.

more

2015

Tetraspanin CD9; more than just an exosome marker - A novel biomarker to target for prostate cancer
Project Grant
Description:

Currently the major hurdle facing the successful treatment of solid cancers is the development of metastases (tumour spread), and our lack of understanding of what controls this process. 

more

2014

Tetraspanin CD9; more than just an exosome marker - A novel biomarker to target for prostate cancer
Project Grant
Description:

Currently the major hurdle facing the successful treatment of solid cancers is the development of metastases (tumour spread), and our lack of understanding of what controls this process.

more