Dr Vicki Maltby

Dr Vicki Maltby
Research Program:
Research Topics:
Project Grant
2017 Project Grant
Project Grant
2016 Project Grant
Project Grant
2015 Project Grant
Project Grant
2014 Project Grant
Project Grant
2013 Project Grant
Travel Grant
2012 Travel Grant

What are your research interests?

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) - What causes MS is poorly understood. I am interested in better understanding mechanisms underlying MS with the hopes of discovering targets for more effective therapies or a cure.

Why did you get into research?

Research gives me the opportunity to work in a challenging and stimulating work environment, which I have always enjoyed, while also working towards improving the lives and health of those affected by autoimmune disease.

What would be the ultimate goal for your research?

I would love to find a cure for Multiple Sclerosis.  MS is a devastating disease that affects patients for the rest of their lives.  A cure would have a huge impact on patients and their families.

Biography

Dr Vicki Maltby is a postdoctoral researcher in the Information Based Medicine research group at the University of Newcastle and HMRI. Having completed her PhD and Bachelor of Science at the University of British Columbia, Canada, she is interested in furthering current understanding of Multiple Sclerosis (MS).

Using a  large-scale, genome-wide approach, Dr Maltby assesses the various epigenetic profiles of immune cells in MS patients and healthy controls to determine if these epigenetic changes have functional consequences. She also compares the different MS subtypes to see if there are changes that are predictive of disease subtype and severity.

Dr Maltby has published a number of scientific articles in high-ranking journals and has presented at national and international conferences. She has received funding from Multiple Sclerosis Research Australia and also the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, yielding over $460,000 while contributing to nine journal articles and six conference presentations.

Future Focus

Current therapies are only effective for some MS subtypes. By understanding the pathogenesis of MS, and the different subtypes, we hope to provide new targets for therapy. This in turn will help develop new therapies and hopefully lead to a cure.

Specialised/ Technical Skills

  • Blood processing
  • Flow cytometry
  • Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay (ChIP)
  • Sequencing
  • Immune cell isolation
  • Tissue culture
  • Western blotting
  • PCR
  • qPCR
  • Scientific writing
  • Basic statistical analysis

Affiliations

2017

The effect of common Multiple Sclerosis treatments on Epigenetic markers in patients
Project Grant
Researchers:
Description:

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is the most common non-traumatic neurological disorder that affects young adults.  MS is a chronic, life-long, disease which has no cure. A recent study from Newcastle describes a doubling of the incidence and prevalence of MS in the last 15 years. In patients with MS, the protective layer that coats the nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord (called myelin) is damaged by the body’s own immune system. This damage hinders the ability of the nerve cells to transmit signals. MS is progressive, unpredictable and varies extensively between individuals, resulting in a broad spectrum of symptoms including physical, mental, and psychiatric problems depending on which areas of the brain or spinal cord are affected.

more

2016

Prader-Willi Syndrome: assessment of central hypothyroidism using novel biomarkers (serum micro-RNA)
Project Grant
Researchers:

Dr Komal Vora, A/Professor Patricia Crock, Dr Vicki Maltby

Description:

HCRF has funded Dr Komal Vora’s study into Prader-Willi Syndrome – a complex genetic disorder that affects development and growth of the child, manifesting as cognitive disability, obesity, short stature and a chronic feeling of hunger.

more

2015

The effect of treatment on patients with Multiple Sclerosis
Project Grant
Description:

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is the most common non-traumatic neurological disorder that affects young adults.

more

2014

Characterization of non-genetic factors causing Multiple Sclerosis.
Project Grant
Description:

MS is progressive, unpredictable and varies extensively between individuals. 

more

2013

Antipituitary Autoantibodies and Pituitary Target Autoantigens
Project Grant
Researchers:

Dr Vicki Maltby, Associate Professor Patricia Crock, Professor Rodney Scott

Description:

The thyroid gland is responsible for the secretion of hormones involved in growth, sleep patterns, and cognitive development.

more

2012

HCRF Travel Award 2012
Travel Grant
Researchers: