Kate Booth | Public Health Researcher

Kate Booth | Public Health Researcher

What are your research interests?

  • Exploring ways to provide equitable healthcare to marginalized populations
  • Social influences on health
  • Gender and sexuality

Why did you get into research?

I have always been interested on the way that our lived experiences shape and impact our everyday practices. I’m particularly driven by the desire to explore the experiences and perceptions shared by those who don’t often have their voices heard. Through research we are able to engage with people of various groups, which helps develop understanding of how to best address any barriers and their needs.

What would be the ultimate goal for your research?

I believe that particular groups are sometimes overlooked during health research. My aim is to share voices of marginalized and vulnerable populations with the ultimate goal of providing equitable healthcare. I want to share the experiences of individuals to help shape the way we offer health services to particular communities, which should be catered to address their needs.

Biography

Kate Booth is a PhD candidate with the University of Newcastle. Their PhD looks to explore lived experiences of class and public space in Newcastle, Australia. The aim of the study is to understand the implications of class and disruption on communities and individuals.
Kate completed their honours thesis on women in sport, specifically looking at gender and sexuality in Australian Rules football. Kate would like to pursue social implications on health and status in marginalized communities to provide equitable health opportunities to all.

Future Focus

Continue providing health and social research to initiate change in providing voice and opportunity across various communities and marginalized groups.

Specialised/Technical Skills

  • Data collection (both qualitative and quantitative)
  • Manuscript writing
  • Qualitative data analysis

Affiliations

  • Hunter Cancer Research Alliance
  • Faculty of Health and Medicine
  • The Australian Sociological Association