Dr Craig Gedye

Dr Craig Gedye - Cancer Researcher
Equipment Grant
2017 Equipment Grant
Project Grant
2017 Project Grant
Project Grant
2016 Project Grant
Project Grant
2016 Project Grant
Project Grant
2015 Project Grant
Project Grant
2015 Project Grant
Project Grant
2015 Project Grant
Travel Grant
2015 Travel Grant
Project Grant
2014 Project Grant
Equipment Grant
2014 Equipment Grant

What is your research interest?

My research focuses on understanding the complexity and heterogeneity of cancers in individual patients – what determines the unique differences, and can they be exploited to improve patient outcomes? I undertake clinical, translational and basic cancer research in melanoma, brain, prostate, bladder and kidney cancers.

Why did you get into research?

My research career began in the 1990s with summer studentships in my native New Zealand. After qualifying in medicine I went back to science with a PhD following my Medical Oncology Fellowship in 2004.

It’s frustrating to watch a treatment help one person and fail completely in another, but this is the reality we must face - cancer is different in every person. Recognising this challenge also gives us an opportunity to improve outcomes, and it's this challenge that inspires me and continues to motivate my work.

What is the ultimate goal for your research?

Improved outcomes for people with cancer. This is occurring on several fronts. I am working in the lab to better understand kidney cancer. I’ve found ways to grow kidney cancer in the lab, and found that it behaves more like muscle and bone cancers. Understanding that it behaves like a different cancer will give us new ways to target it. In the clinic I work with our clinical trials team at the CMN to attract world-class clinical trials, and to create our own clinical trials too.

Future Focus

In the not-so-distant future I’m planning to take a closer look at the 3,500 drugs that are currently licenced for use in humans, with the hope that we can “repurpose” some of them as new cancer medications especially in kidney cancer.

In my national role chairing the kidney cancer subcommittee with the ANZUP Cancer Trials Group, we’re able to work with doctors across the country to devise new treatment ideas. My current focus is in kidney cancer trials.

Brief Profile

Dr Craig Gedye is a physician/scientist, dual trained as a medical oncologist and as a basic science cancer researcher. Based at the Calvary Mater Newcastle, he is inspired by working for patients with melanoma, brain, prostate, bladder and kidney cancers.

Dr Gedye’s research focuses on complexity in cancer, with a particular interest in understanding "intratumoural heterogeneity".

After training in New Zealand he moved to Canada in 2008, undertaking a Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Toronto and Princess Margaret Cancer Centre. There, he simultaneously undertook a Clinical Fellowship in melanoma as the new class of cancer drugs, the checkpoint immunotherapy antibodies, came into the clinic.

Dr Gedye moved to Australia in February 2014 to pursue a number of related research interests at the Calvary Mater Newcastle, University of Newcastle and HMRI.

He is leading several biobanking studies and projects, and is a member of the Mark Hughes Scientific Advisory Committee, HNEHLD Clinical Trials Ethics Subcommittee, ANZUP Cancer Trials Scientific Advisory Committee, HCRA Biomarkers Flagship Program Steering Committee and HCB Management Committee.

Dr Gedye has contributed to 28 international research papers and nine conferences.

2017

Honorariums
Project Grant
Researchers:
Description:

Honorariums for speaking at conferences and meetings.

more
Too Much of a Good Thing: Application for a triple-gas incubator to allow cell culture under normal conditions
Equipment Grant
Description:

A very useful and convenient method used in many fields of medical research involves growing cells in the laboratory. Cells are ""cultured"" in plastic dishes in incubators that provide an environment warmed to body temperature, 37 degrees Celsius. Human cells also require carbon dioxide to grow and this is added to the ambient air in the incubator. This kind of cell culture has been used for over a century and has been accepted as the standard way of growing cells in the laboratory. This method is very important and useful in cancer research.

more

2016

Bringing CLARITY to brain cancer
Project Grant
Researchers:

Dr Jamie Flynn, William Palmer, Dr Antony Martin, Dr Craig Gedye

Description:

Cancer is an invasive, adaptive process that interacts and adapts to the microenvironment, subjugating the normal tissue around it to optimise growth and survival. Understanding this growth and interaction in three dimensions will add additional insight into the way cancers expand and spread.

more
BAALC - a novel target for the development of new treatments for brain cancer.
Project Grant
Description:

Cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Brain cancer is the 15th most common cancer in the world, and has one of the worst survival rates of all cancer types, with only approximately half of patients surviving for one year post-diagnosis. This poor survival rate highlights that new treatments for brain cancer are urgently required.

more

2015

BAALC - a novel target for the development of new treatments for brain cancer.
Project Grant
Description:

Cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Brain cancer is the 15th most common cancer in the world, and has one of the worst survival rates of all cancer types, with only approximately half of patients surviving for one year post-diagnosis. This poor survival rate highlights that new treatments for brain cancer are urgently required.

more
Bringing CLARITY to brain cancer
Project Grant
Researchers:

Mr Jamie Flynn, William Palmer, Antony Martin, Craig Gedye

Description:

Cancer is an invasive, adaptive process that interacts and adapts to the microenvironment, subjugating the normal tissue around it to optimise growth and survival.

more
8th COGNO Annual Scientific Meeting, Brisbane, 22-24 October 2015
Travel Grant
Researchers:
Description:

Dr Craig Gedye will use his Mark Hughes Foundation Travel Grant to join top national and international researchers at the COGNO (Co-operative Trials Group for Neuro-Oncology) meeting in Brisbane.

more
The Virtuous Circle: A Living Brain Cancer BioBank
Project Grant
Description:

Whilst treatments for brain cancer are improving these do not work well in all patients. 

more

2014

Triple-gas incubator
Equipment Grant
Description:

Dr Gedye’s basic laboratory research within the HMRI Building will focus on ways of targeting these more aggressive kidney cancer cells, and hopefully lead to novel combinations of old and new drugs to work with the medications routinely used in the clinic.

more
The Virtuous Circle: A Living Brain Cancer BioBank
Project Grant
Description:

Whilst treatments for brain cancer are improving these do not work well in all patients.

more