Dr Linda Campbell

Dr Linda Campbell
Equipment Grant
2017 Equipment Grant
Project Grant
2017 Project Grant
Project Grant
2017 Project Grant
Project Grant
2014 Project Grant
Project Grant
2013 Project Grant
Project Grant
2011 Project Grant
Project Grant
2010 Project Grant
Project Grant
2010 Project Grant
Fellowship
2007 Fellowship

What are your research interests?

My research focuses on healthy and atypical development. One of the key areas of research involves delineating the behavioural phenotype of children and adults with developmental disabilities as well as striving to understand the biological and environmental influences that shape theses developmental processes. Many children with developmental disabilities are at higher risk of developing mental health concerns at some point in their lives and understanding how and why this increased risk is present is important to improve the quality of life of these individuals. I am also undertaking research into maternal and paternal mental health and the relationship to family functioning but also child outcomes.

Why did you get into research? 

Working with families who have loved ones affected by disabilities or mental health problems can be heartbreaking but more often it fills you with an enormous sense of hope to see how resilient many families are. To figure out what makes so many families strong in the face of adversity and to use that knowledge to help other families, that is one of the reasons why I am a researcher.

What would be the ultimate goal for your research?

To empower families that have more challenges than others, to overcome and get stronger to provide the best possible support for their children and each other. 

Brief Profile

Dr Campbell is a chief investigator with the Priority Research Centre GrowUpWell and the School of Psychology at the University of Newcastle. Dr Campbell completed a Bachelor of Psychology Honours (first class) at the University College London, UK and went on to complete a PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London in 2006.

She was awarded a NHMRC Australian Training Fellowship in 2006 to undertake further research of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome at the University of Newcastle prior to commencing an academic position in the School of Psychology in 2011. Subsequent to beginning her current academic position as a Lecturer in Psychology, Dr Campbell has completed a Master of Clinical Psychology and is currently a registrar Clinical Psychologist. 

Dr Campbell has published numerous peer-reviewed articles in the field and has presented at many prestigious national and international conferences. She is an experienced supervisor at undergraduate and postgraduate level and is the lead scientist for the Family Interaction and Neurodevelopment Lab (FINDLab) at the Ourimbah campus. 

Future Focus

Improving outcomes for vulnerable people and their families through increased knowledge, understanding, awareness and respect.

Specialised/Technical Skills 

  • Developmental and cognitive assessments (eg Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development , Wechsler scales, Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule, Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised)
  • Social cognition
  • Mental health assessments
  • Eye-tracking methodologies (Eyelink 1000)
  • Brain imaging (fMRI, MRI, DTI)

Affiliations 

2017

Infant Equipment
Equipment Grant
Description:

These items will be used jointly by the named investigators to expand current collaborative work in the areas of early child development, impact of maternal chronic illness on early child outcomes and neurodevelopmental disability.

more
Do sensory symptoms impact outcomes of the Alert Program for children with Autism Spectrum Disorder?
Project Grant
Researchers:
Description:

"Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) affects learning, social participation and daily function across the lifespan. Approximately 35,000 school-aged Australian children live with ASD; 95% of these experience educational restrictions. ASD has no known cure, and its causes are poorly understood due to the variability in how the disorder emerges and presents. Further, available treatments are only moderately successful and are not effective for all children with ASD. Knowledge about what (intervention) is likely to work for whom is missing from the field.

more
Tour Des Femmes Project
Project Grant

2014

Here's looking at you kid: Face processing, emotional availability and reflective functioning in mothers with post natal depression
Project Grant
Description:

The proposed study is significant and timely, and examines the important public health issue of postnatal depression, a debilitating disorder that impacts on the individual, the infant and the broader family.

more

2013

Here's looking at you kid: Face processing, emotional availability and reflective functioning in mothers with post natal depression
Project Grant
Description:

The proposed study is significant and timely, and examines the important public health issue of postnatal depression, a debilitating disorder that impacts on the individual, the infant and the broader family.

more

2011

Here's looking at you kid: Face processing, emotional availability and reflective functioning in mothers with post natal depression
Project Grant

2010

Here's looking at you kid: Face processing, emotional availability and reflective functioning in mothers with post natal depression
Project Grant
Pulse Education Prize
Project Grant
Researchers:

2007

Research Fellowship - Ms Linda Campbell
Fellowship