Dr Lisa Lincz

Research Program:
Project Grant
2018 Project Grant
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2017 Project Grant
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2016 Project Grant
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2015 Project Grant
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2014 Project Grant
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2011 Project Grant
Equipment Grant
2011 Equipment Grant
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2011 Project Grant
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2010 Project Grant
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2010 Project Grant
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2010 Project Grant
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2009 Project Grant
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2007 Project Grant
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2006 Project Grant
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2002 Project Grant
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2001 Project Grant
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2000 Project Grant

What are your research interests?

  • Circulating biomarkers of disease, disease susceptibility, and response to treatment
  • Normal and pathological effects of circulating microvesicles and their cargo

Why did you get into research? 

I have always been fascinated by the ingenious complexities within the human body that are invisible to the naked eye. The challenge of deciphering them is my driving force.

What would be the ultimate goal for your research?

I would love to be able to use a single blood sample to determine a person's health status, risk of disease, diagnosis of any disease they may not be aware of, and ultimately what treatment will cure them without causing any harm.   

Brief Profile

Dr Lincz has been employed by the Calvary Mater Newcastle (CMN) Hospital in the Hunter Haematology Research Group since 1998 where she is presently the Senior Research Officer and holds a conjoint Associate Professor position at the University of Newcastle’s School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy.  Dr Lincz’s research interests combine a background in molecular biology with current knowledge of clinical haematology and a passion for discovering biomarkers of disease and response to treatment. 

Dr Lincz has a strong background in cancer biology, having been awarded her PhD in 1998 for work examining the role of cellular adhesion and three-dimensional structures in preventing programmed cell death in colon cancer. In order to support what is now a more translational form of research, she went on to complete a Graduate Diploma in Clinical Epidemiology (Molecular Genetics) in 2007 at the University of Newcastle. Dr Lincz has taken a more recent interest in thrombosis and coagulation, as evidenced by her publications of the past five years, her NHMRC grants and current collaborations with the International Stroke Consortium and Subcommittee of the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

Dr. Lincz is Chairperson for the CMN Research Committee (since 2006), peer reviews for many funding bodies and publishers, and has successfully supervised both undergraduate and higher research degrees (currently 2 PhD students). She has been invited to present her work on microvesicles at national and international conferences, and has published numerous peer-reviewed articles in the field. 

Future Focus

I am currently analysing circulating microparticles from the blood of people with various diseases in order to determine how they  contribute to disease; with the hopes of one day finding a way to stop them.

Specialised/Technical Skills 

  • Micovesicle analysis by flow cytometry
  • Nanosight nanoparticle tracking analysis
  • Molecular and cellular biology
  • Statistical analysis

Affiliations 

  • HMRI Cancer Research Group
  • Priority Research Centre for Cancer
  • Hunter Cancer Research Alliance
  • UoN School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
  • Chairperson, Newcastle Mater Hospital Research Committee 
  • Hunter HUB steering committee, NSW Research HUBS initiative 
  • Australasian Leukaemia and Lymphoma Group (ALLG)
  • Australian Society for Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ASTH)
  • International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH).
  • International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV)
     

2018

Teaching old dogs new tricks – PARP inhibitors as treatments for childhood cancers
Project Grant
Description:

Cancer is the most common cause of childhood disease-related deaths, with leukaemia the most common childhood cancer in Australia.

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2017

Re-purposing PARP inhibitors to treat childhood leukaemias
Project Grant
Description:

Cancer is the most common cause of childhood disease-related deaths, with leukaemia the most common childhood cancer in Australia. The two most common forms of leukaemia in children are acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Whilst remission is achievable in over 95% of ALL cases, 1/3 of patients will relapse within 5 to 10 years, and these children will not be long-term survivors. AML accounts for 20% of all childhood leukaemias, and the outlook for children diagnosed with AML is much worse, with only approximately half of children surviving for 5 years post-diagnosis.

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2016

Defining and predicting clinical toxicity in GBM patients undergoing temozolomide-radiation treatment: A multivariate study.
Project Grant
Researchers:

Dr James Lynam, Dr Jennette Sakoff, Professor Jenny Martin, Dr Lisa Lincz, Dr Mike Fay, Giovana Celli Marchett, Dr Peter Galettis

Description:

Annually there are 2,000 new cases of brain cancer in Australia. Prognosis for people with brain cancer is dire. It is the highest cause of death in 0-39 age group with a 5-year survival rate of 19%. Brain cancer results in 5,000 hospitalisations per year (average stay 12.5 days, the longest of any cancer) and has the highest lifetime cost per patient of $1.89m [1].

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2015

Defining and predicting clinical toxicity in GBM patients undergoing temozolomide-radiation treatment: A multivariate study.
Project Grant
Researchers:

Dr James Lynam, Jennette Sakoff, Jenny Martin, Lisa Lincz, Mike Fay, Giovana Celli Marchett, Peter Galettis

Description:

Annually there are 2,000 new cases of brain cancer in Australia. Prognosis for people with brain cancer is dire. It is the highest cause of death in 0-39 age group with a 5-year survival rate of 19%. Brain cancer results in 5,000 hospitalisations per year (average stay 12.5 days, the longest of any cancer) and has the highest lifetime cost per patient of $1.89m.

more

2014

What is different about red blood cells in people with type 2 diabetes?
Project Grant
Researchers:

Dr Lisa Lincz, Dr Rick Thorne

Description:

The aim of this research is to understand how diabetes cause complications in other parts of the body.

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2011

Establishment of Fat1 cadherin as biomarker and unique target for anti-cancer therapy in paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia
Project Grant
Researchers:

Dr Rick Thorne, Charles de Bock, Lisa Lincz

High-Resolution Isoelectric Phosphoprotein Signalling System for Signalling Research, Biomarker Validation and Drug Development
Equipment Grant
Researchers:
Pathogenic of Plasma CD36 Microparticles in Mediating Complications of Type 2 Diabetes
Project Grant
Researchers:

Dr Rick Thorne, Lisa Lincz

2010

How chronic psychological distress leads to premature aging
Project Grant
Researchers:

Associate Professor Eugene Nalivaiko, Lisa Lincz

Pathogenic of Plasma CD36 Microparticles in Mediating Complications of Type 2 Diabetes
Project Grant
Researchers:

Dr Rick Thorne, Lisa Lincz

Vascular Ischemia Study
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2009

Identification of Leukaemic Stem Cell based upon their expression of a novel surface marker, Fat1.
Project Grant
Researchers:

Dr Rick Thorne, Lisa Lincz

2007

A novel adhesive target involved in the survival of leukaemia cells
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Researchers:

Dr Rick Thorne, Dr Lisa Lincz

2006

Overcoming radiation resistance in malignant melanoma
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2002

PULSE Education Prize
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Researchers:

2001

Influence of haematopoetic stem cell temerase activity on bone marrow recovery following myoablative therapy.
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Researchers:

Dr Lisa Lincz, Dr A. Enno

2000

Newcastle and Hunter Junior Chamber Special Commendation Prize
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Researchers: